Flailing Her Puerto Rican Ponytail

My ponytail will cut you.

A black male could not offer his hand (to shake hands) with a white male because it implied being socially equal. Obviously, a black male could not offer his hand or any other part of his body to a white woman, because he risked being accused of rape.

Blacks and whites were not supposed to eat together. If they did eat together, whites were to be served first, and some sort of partition was to be placed between them.

Under no circumstance was a black male to offer to light the cigarette of a white female — that gesture implied intimacy.

Blacks were not allowed to show public affection toward one another in public, especially kissing, because it offended whites.

Jim Crow etiquette prescribed that blacks were introduced to whites, never whites to blacks. For example: “Mr. Peters (the white person), this is Charlie (the black person), that I spoke to you about.”

Whites did not use courtesy titles of respect when referring to blacks, for example, Mr., Mrs., Miss., Sir, or Ma’am. Instead, blacks were called by their first names. Blacks had to use courtesy titles when referring to whites, and were not allowed to call them by their first names.

If a black person rode in a car driven by a white person, the black person sat in the back seat, or the back of a truck.

White motorists had the right-of-way at all intersections.

Jim Crow Etiquette Just a little more history for the folks who think slavery was the end of racism in America. (via karnythia)

My suburban white friends were so confused that my parents introduced themselves as Mr. and Mrs. and that I always addressed adults that way. They just don’t know.  And I don’t know how popular of a trend this was, but some Black folks gave their children honorifics as first names so white people would have no choice but to call them ‘Mister’ or ‘Sir’.  Like, I know tangentially of a woman who’s first name is Doctor.

(via blackraincloud)

Blacks were not allowed to show public affection toward one another in public, especially kissing, because it offended whites.”

Can we look at this one right here real close?

POC in intimate relationships showing each other affection *was considered offensive*. I am kinda wondering, given the absence of intra poc relationships in mass media, if it still is considered as such.

(via deluxvivens)

PRECISELY WHAT CAUGHT MY EYE. DA FUCK?????????????????

(via searchingforknowledge)

Well looking at this post, yes

http://ai-yo.tumblr.com/post/25570734067/deluxvivens-karnythia-deluxvivens-snip

(via ai-yo)

(via so-treu)

so-treu:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   
Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

yeah. anti-porn, anti-sex work feminists are utter shit.

so-treu:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. 

Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .

Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   

In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   

Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

yeah. anti-porn, anti-sex work feminists are utter shit.

“Stealing Chickens” & “Manifesting Prostitution:” Lizzy Williams, Monica Jones & Criminalizing Black Women

Black women in the U.S. have been excluded from definitions of ‘respectable’ and/or ‘proper’ womanhood, sexuality, & beauty. This matters when one considers how we’re treated within society as a result. Black women have also been constructed as always ‘publicly available.’ Think of how this played out for Monica Jones as a trans black woman (though repeatedly misgendered by authorities) and for other black women. If we are always ‘publicly available,’ then charging us with manifestation of prostitution is more likely. These ideological constructs have their roots in justifying slavery and our general subjugation. They are doing particular work and we see this work clearly ‘manifested’ in the historical criminalization of black women. Unfortunately, there have been few studies about the history of black women’s punishment and criminalization. Notable exceptions include work by Kali Gross and Ann Butler. So when I come across interesting stories about crime and punishment in Black women’s history, I try to document them.

(Source: so-treu)

Just last week, a 7th grader with a curvy build came home upset about this. She had worn an outfit with a skirt and leggings, and in the morning, a teacher had said to her, “Cute outfit.” But then her homeroom teacher pulled her aside at the end of the day and said, “You know, another girl could get away with that outfit, but you should not be wearing that. I’m going to dress code you.” Juliet Bond and the child’s mom were discussing the incident, not certain if the message to the child was ‘you’re too sexy’ or ‘you’re too fat.’

The kids also report that the teachers have been discussing ‘appropriate body types for leggings and yoga pants and inappropriate body types for yoga pants and leggings.’

Bond says, “This is concerning because it is both slut shaming and fat shaming. If a girl is heavy or developed, the message is that she cannot wear certain clothes.” Neither is acceptable. We should not be sexualizing kids, nor should we be making them feel that they can wear leggings as long as they remain stick thin. Bond asks, “Why are the girls being pulled out of class to have assemblies on whether they are wearing the right clothes, while the boys remain in class, learning and studying?”

I don’t have a problem with a school having a dress code; in fact, I attended a school that didn’t allow jeans or shorts or shirts without collars, but I do have a problem when the dress code is discriminately based on gender and body type. There is a big difference between telling all students to dress respectfully and telling curvy girls to dress in a way that doesn’t distract boys.

The Real Problem with Leggings Ban for Middle School Girls: Specific Targets | Alternet (via becauseiamawoman)

do people realize that when you talk about how middle school dress codes are “slut shaming” you are literally calling 12 year old girls sluts omg can we be done with that phrase

(via deamhain)

END THE PHRASE ‘SLUT SHAMING’.

The body policing is F’d up, though.

(via locsgirl)

but isn’t the point that it’s shaming people for being perceived as ‘sluts’? like it’s not necessarily saying that they identify that way. i’m pretty sure nobody who uses the term ‘slut shaming’ would say “if you get slut shamed, you’re a slut”

(via tough-grrrl)

Yeah, the idea behind the term “slut shaming” is not to call people sluts, but to point out that using “slut” as an insult is fucked up.

Now, there are other issues with the term, but suggesting it calls people sluts is just fundamentally incorrect.

(via telegantmess)

(via telegantmess)

10 Ways to Love Others

eatcakey:

 

Some guidelines for loving:

1. Tell them about their brilliance. They likely can’t see it and they don’t know its immensity, but you can see it, and you can illuminate it for them.

2. Be authentic, and give others the gift of the real you and a real relationship. Ask your real questions. Share your real beliefs. Go for your real dreams. Tell your truth.

3. Don’t confuse “authenticity” with sharing every complaint, resentment, or petty reaction in the name of “being yourself.” Meditate, write, or do yoga to work through anxiety, resentment, and stress on your own so you don’t hand off those negative moods to everyone around you. Sure, share sadness, honest dilemmas, and fears, but be mindful: don’t pollute.

4. Listen, listen, listen. Don’t listen to determine if you agree or disagree. Listen to get to know what is true for the person in front of you. Get to know an inner landscape that is different from your own, and enjoy the journey. Remember that if, in any conversation, nothing piqued your curiosity and nothing surprised you, you weren’t really listening.

5. Don’t waste your time or energy thinking about how they need to be different.  Really. Chuck that whole thing. Their habits are their habits. Their personalities are their personalities. Let them be, and work on what you want to change about you—not what you think would be good to change about them.

6. Remember that you don’t have to understand their choices to respect or accept them. 

7. Don’t conflate accepting with being a doormat or betraying yourself. Let them be who they are, entirely. Then, you decide what you need, in light of who they are. Do you need to make a direct request that they change their behavior in some way? Do you need to take care of yourself better? Do you need to set a boundary or to change the relationship? Take care of yourself well, without holding anyone else in contempt.

8. Give of yourself, but never sacrifice or compromise yourself. Stop if resentment is building and retool. Don’t do the martyr thing. It helps no one and nothing.

9. Remember that everyone you encounter was created by divine intelligence and has an important role to play in the universe. Treat them as such.

10. If you want to keep growing emotionally and spiritually for the rest of your life, accept this as your mantra and try to live as if it were true: Everything that I experience from another human being is either love, or a call for love.

What steps do you take to love others?

(Source: ohapoeticsoul)

My pareja found this Spanish language edition of This Bridge Called my Back in a local bookstore.

My pareja found this Spanish language edition of This Bridge Called my Back in a local bookstore.